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January New Jobs Disappoints Forecast; Downward Revisions To 2015

February 5th, 2016

jobs reportJill Mislinski:  Here are the lead paragraphs from the Employment Situation Summary released this morning by the Bureau of Labor Statistics:

Total nonfarm payroll employment rose by 151,000 in January, and the unemployment rate was little changed at 4.9 percent, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. Job gains occurred in several industries, led by retail trade, food services and drinking places, health care, and manufacturing. Employment declined in private educational services, transportation and warehousing, and mining.

Today’s report of 151K new nonfarm jobs in January was lower than the Investing.com forecast of 190K. December’s nonfarm payrolls was revised downward by 151K. Downward revisions were made to all 2015 nonfarm payrolls. The unemployment rate declined slightly to 4.9%.

Here is a snapshot of the monthly percent change in Nonfarm Employment since 2000.

PAYEMS Monthly Change

The unemployment peak for the current cycle was 10.0% in October 2009. The chart here shows the pattern of unemployment, recessions and the S&P Composite since 1948.

Unemployment is usually a lagging indicator that moves inversely with equity prices (top series in the chart). Note the increasing peaks in unemployment in 1971, 1975 and 1982. The mirror relationship appears to be repeating itself with the most recent and previous bear markets.

Unemployment and the Market

The next chart shows the unemployment rate for the civilian population unemployed 27 weeks and over. This rate has fallen significantly since its 4.4% all-time peak in April 2010. It is now at 1.3%, a post-recession low, unchanged from the previous month

Unemployed 27+ Weeks

The next chart is an overlay of the unemployment rate and the employment-population ratio. This is the ratio of the number of employed people to the total civilian population age 16 and over.

Employment Population Ratio

The inverse correlation between the two series is obvious. We can also see the accelerating growth of women in the workforce and two-income households in the early 1980′s. Following the end of the last recession, the employment population has been range bound between 58.2% and 59.4% — the lower end of which that harkens back to the 58.1% ratio of March 1953, when Eisenhower was president of a country of one-income households, the Korean War was still underway, and rumors were circulating that soft drinks would soon be sold in cans.

The latest ratio of 59.6% is now at its post-recession high.

For a confirming view of the secular change the US is experiencing on the employment front, the next chart illustrates the labor force participation rate. We’re at 62.7%, up 0.1% from last month.

Labor Force Participation Rate

The employment-population ratio and participation rate will be interesting to watch going forward. The first wave of Boomers will continue to be a downward force on this ratio. The oldest of them were eligible for early retirement when the Great Recession began, and the transition of the Boomer cohort to full retirement age won’t end until 2030.

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