It Costs Central Banks $200 Billion Per Quarter To Avoid A Market Crash

wall streetTyler Durden: We have all seen it countless times before: visual confirmation that without the Fed’s (and all other central banks’) liquidity pump, the S&P would be about 70% lower than were it is now.

Most recently, this was shown last Friday in “Another Reminder How Addicted Markets Still Are To Liquidity” in which Deutsche bank’s Jim Reid said:

The recovery from the lows after Bullard spoke yesterday is another reminder how addicted markets still are to liquidity. Indeed in today’s pdf we reprint and  update a table from our 2014 Outlook showing the various phases of the Fed’s balance sheet expansion and pausing over the last 5-6 years and its impact on equities and credit. We have found that the relationship broadly works best with markets pricing in the Fed balance sheet move just under 3 months in advance. We’ve also included our oft-used chart of the Fed balance sheet vs the S&P 500 to help demonstrate this. So end July / early August 2014 was always the time that this relationship suggested markets should enter a new more difficult phase. So we still think central bankers hold the key to markets going forward and there seems to be a hint of change in the Fed.

Another view was shown over the weekend, in “The Chart That Explains Why Fed’s Bullard Wants To Restart The QE Flow” which shows that when the Fed’s excess reserve firehose is turned on Max, stocks surge; when it isn’t – as has been the case recently – they tumble.

 

So now that “best Keynesian practices” are out of the window, and everyone has once again turned Austrian, and only the “flow of money” (either inside or outside) matters, the question is how much do central banks need to inject to keep the stock market from crashing, let alone continuing to levitate. Luckily, Citi’s Matt King has just done the math, and the answer is…

Here is his answer:

We think the markets’ weakness owes more to an almost belated reaction to a temporary lull in central bank stimulus than it does to any reduction in the effect of that stimulus in propping up asset prices.

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