Can The U.S. Escape The Rapid Inflation Coming? [SPDR Gold Trust (ETF), iShares Silver Trust (ETF), iShares Gold Trust(ETF), ETFS Gold Trust]

inflationMichael Lombardi: Is the Federal Reserve ignoring the very basic law of economics…the law of diminishing marginal utility? You remember that term from economics in high school. The law of diminishing marginal utility states that the more of something you have, the lesser its impact on you.

The Fed has been printing money in hopes of stimulating growth in the U.S. economy. As the Fed printed more paper money, its balance sheet grew to over $4.0 trillion.

Below, I’ve made a table that looks at gross domestic product (GDP) growth in the U.S. each year since 2009, and where the balance sheet of our central bank stood at the end of each year.

In the table below, you will notice something interesting; aside from 2009, there is no real correlation between the increases in the assets (paper money printed) on the Fed’s balance sheet and GDP growth. In fact, after all the money the Fed has printed, the U.S. economy grew last year at its slowest pace since 2011.

U.S. GDP Growth vs. Growth in Size of Fed Balance Sheet

Year YOY Change
in GDP
Fed Balance Sheet (Trillions) YOY Change in Balance Sheet
2009 -2.80% $2.08 73.44%
2010 2.50% $2.31 11.21%
2011 1.84% $2.74 18.58%
2012 2.77% $2.86 4.36%
2013 1.87% $3.47 21.33%

Data source: Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis web site,
last accessed April 1, 2014.

The Federal Reserve predicts the U.S. GDP in 2014 will increase between 2.8% and three percent; that’s a jump of about 50% since 2013. (Source: Federal Reserve, March 19, 2014.) I believe this to be way too optimistic. (And as we have seen in the past, these projections are usually guided lower later in the year anyway.)

Since the beginning of 2014, we have been seeing dismal economic data suggesting the U.S. economy will not be growing as much as expected this year.

The law of diminishing marginal utility is starting to become very evident; the money printing is not producing the positive effects on the economy like it did before.

Examples of slow growth this year…

Personal consumption, a big part of U.S. GDP, is soft, as U.S. retailers have been posting very soft sales increases this year.

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